Biological effects of ionizing radiation at the molecular level
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Biological effects of ionizing radiation at the molecular level proceedings. by Symposium on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation at the Molecular Level (1962 Brno, Czechoslovakia)

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Published by International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Radiobiology -- Congresses.,
  • Molecular biology -- Congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Series[International Atomic Energy Agency] Proceedings series, Proceedings series (International Atomic Energy Agency)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQH652.A2 S92 1962
The Physical Object
Pagination461 p.
Number of Pages461
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5623443M
LC Control Number68035596

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Get this from a library! Biological effects of ionizing radiation at the molecular level; proceedings of the symposium on the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the molecular level,. [International Atomic Energy Agency.]. ways through ionizing radiation makes damage in the cell and molecular level in the exposed organisms. The present review article is intended to discuss the mechanisms of biological damage and main diseases related to ionizing radiation exposure. Keywords: Ionizing radiation Cancer Interventional cardiology Bystander effect DNAAuthor: Julio Cesar Rodriguez Goyes, Nicolas Jaramillo Gomez, Valentina Jaramillo Restrepo, Simon Gaviria, A. Available in the National Library of Australia collection. Author: Symposium on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation at the Molecular Level, ( Brno, Czechoslovakia); Format: Book; p. .   BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING. RADIATION AT MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR LEVELS. Module VIII-a Historical background. Module Medical VIII Discovery of X rays () Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. Module Medical VIII Discovery of uraniums natural radioactivity. Antoine Henri Becquerel. Module Medical VIII. Marie Curie-4 First reports on harmful.

Four things can happen when radiation enters a cell: 1. The radiation may pass through without any damage occurring; 2. The radiation may damage the cell, but the cell repairs the damage; 3. The radiation may damage the cell the damage is not repaired and the cell replicates itself in the damaged form; 4. The cell dies. IONIZING RADIATION: SOURCES AND BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation Report to the General Assembly, with annexes UNITED NATIONS B. Emironmental levels and doses .. C. Other sources of radiation exposure. IONIZING RADIATION: SOURCES AND BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation Report to the General Assembly, with annexes UNITED NATIONS New York, NOTE an individual, the level of exposure can give an. Start studying Radiation Biology, Molecular effects of Ionizing Radiation. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

Previous chapter: Ionizing radiation protection. A dose of ionizing radiation absorbed in a biological environment will initiate a complex process of various events. The physical events start with energy transfer from the ionizing particles to the atoms and molecules of surrounding tissues. This process takes about seconds. Following this, physicochemical processes take place, such. Biological effects of ionizing radiation at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Annual progress report, Octo Octo [Quantitation of rotor speed dependent DNA sedimentation and zero shear rate reduced recoil]. No biological effects in individuals have ever been documented as being due to levels of ionizing radiation employed for medical diagnosis. Absorbed doses from nuclear medicine procedures are very low. Fear of radiation must not be permitted to undermine the great value of radiation in clinical practice. However, safe handling of all levels of. There is a large difference in the magnitude of the biological effects of nonionizing radiation (for example, light and microwaves) and ionizing radiation, emissions energetic enough to knock electrons out of molecules (for example, α and β particles, γ rays, X-rays, and high-energy ultraviolet radiation). .